Uganda

Young Africa Works

Our Goal: Over the next 10 years, Young Africa Works will enable three million young people in Uganda to access dignified work.

Context: Uganda is the first African country in which Mastercard Foundation partnered with in 2008. Over the last 11 years, the key area of focus has been expanding access to finance, education, and skills training to smallholder farmers, teachers, out of school youth and youth in agriculture across the country.

Our Approach: In Uganda, the Young Africa Works strategy is aligned with the government’s priorities and embraces the private sector-led economic development approach. Our strategy focuses on sectors that are prioritized by the government and are anticipated to create work opportunities for young women, men, and refugees. With an estimated refugee population of 1.4 million in Uganda, Young Africa Works will work closely with key stakeholders to enable young refugees and young people in their host communities, especially young women, to acquire the skills needed to find employment or to create their own work opportunities.

Priority Sectors: Agriculture, tourism and hospitality, and construction and housing.

Our initial commitment of USD 200 million will focus on:

  • supporting agri-food systems and agribusiness through the commercialization of agriculture;
  • strengthening Uganda’s growing tourism and hospitality sector; and
  • leveraging the significant public and private investment in the construction sector by improving vocational training and expanding access to financial services for micro-, small-, and medium-sized enterprises (MSMEs) working in construction.

Additionally, in collaboration with the private sector, Young Africa Works will aim to unlock domestic and international investments to spur growth in micro-, small-, and medium-sized enterprises.

Apply to Young Africa Works in Uganda

Our partners manage the recruitment and selection of program participants.

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